Major KAWS Show, $533.7 M. Villa with Caravaggio Mural Fails to Sell, John Sainsbury (1927-2022), and more

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JANUARY 18, 2022

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Major KAWS Exhibition Opens at the Serpentine and on Fortnite: ‘It’s Like a Mirror’

BY SHANTI ESCALANTE-DE MATTEI

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$533.7 M. Roman Villa Containing Caravaggio Mural Fails to Sell After Receiving No Bids

BY ALEX GREENBERGER

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John Sainsbury, Supermarket Magnate Who Transformed London’s Museums, Dies at 94

BY SHANTI ESCALANTE-DE MATTEI

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“Austin Ballerd + Erin Murray | Breather” at Pentimenti Gallery, Philadelphia

“CAMP@CLAMP” at ClampArt, New York

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South Korea’s Oldest Private Museum to Sell Two ‘National Treasures’ for $71 M.

BY ALEX GREENBERGER

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1-54 Cancels 2022 Edition, Citing the ‘Reality of the Present World Situation’

BY TESSA SOLOMON

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Jonathan Brown, Art Historian Who Wrote Defining Books on Velázquez, Dies at 82

BY FRANCESCA ATON

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Sheldon Solow’s Long-Inaccessible Art Collection to Be Displayed to the Public

BY ANGELICA VILLA

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Citibanamex’s Prestigious Art Collection is Up for Sale, Triggering Calls for it to Remain in Mexico

BY TESSA SOLOMON

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Tate Liverpool Seeks Architecture Plans for $34 M. Refurbishment

BY ANDY BATTAGLIA

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Desert X AlUla Reveals Artist List for Second Edition

BY TESSA SOLOMON

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ArtDaily Newsletter: Tuesday, Jan 18, 2022

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The First Art Newspaper on the Net facebook.png twitter.png instagram.png Established in 1996 Tuesday, January 18, 2022
The Kunga was a status symbol long before the thoroughbred
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A burial site in Umm el-Marra, Syria, where the skeletons of 44 kungas, hybrids of female donkeys and Syrian wild asses, were uncovered. A new study finds the first known instance of a human-engineered hybrid, bred from a donkey and a Syrian wild ass 4,500 years ago. Glenn Schwartz/John Hopkins University via The New York Times.

by James Gorman

NEW YORK, NY.- In ancient Mesopotamia 4,500 years ago, long before horses arrived in the region, another spirited member of the equine family, the kunga, took a starring role in pulling four-wheeled wagons into battle. Archaeologists had suspected that these animals — depicted in art, their sales recorded in cuneiform writing, their bodies sometimes laid to rest in rich burial sites — were the result of some kind of crossbreeding. But proof was lacking. On Friday, a team of researchers reported on more than a decade of research in the journal Science Advances, concluding that studies of ancient DNA showed the kunga was a cross between a female donkey (Equus Africanus asinus) and a male Syrian wild ass (Equus hemionus hemippus). The kunga is the first known instance of a human-engineered hybrid of two species, a production far beyond the traditional processes of the domestication of animals, researchers found. Eva-Maria Geigl, a specialist in ancient genomes at the University of Paris, and o … More

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The Best Photos of the Day
Best Photos of the Day
Ettore Spalletti at Marian Goodman Gallery, New York. January 11 – March 5, 2022. Courtesy: Studio Ettore Spalletti and Marian Goodman © Studio Ettore Spalletti. Photo: Alex Yudzon.

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Photographer Steve Schapiro has died at age 87 David Zwirner opens the first solo presentation of Josef Albers’s work in Greater China 555.55 carat black diamond to make auction debut
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Martin Luther King Marching for Voting Rights with John Lewis, Reverend Jesse Douglas, James Forman and Ralph Abernathy, Selma, 1965 © Steve Schapiro/Courtesy Monroe Gallery of Photography.

SANTA FE, NM.- Steve Schapiro died peacefully on January 15 surrounded by his wife, Maura Smith, and son, Theophilus Donoghue in Chicago, Illinois after battling pancreatic cancer. He was 87. Steve Schapiro discovered photography at the age of nine at summer camp. Excited by the camera’s potential, Schapiro spent the next decades prowling the streets of his native New York City trying to emulate the work of French photographer Henri Cartier Bresson, whom he greatly admired. His first formal education in photography came when he studied under the photojournalist W. Eugene Smith. Smith’s influence on Schapiro was far-reaching. He taught him the technical skills he needed to succeed as a photographer but also informed his personal outlook and worldview. Schapiro’s lifelong interest in social documentary and his consistently empathetic portrayal of his subjects … More

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Josef Albers, Study for Graphic Tectonic (Ascension), 1941. Ink and graphite on paper, 56.2 x 43.5 cm © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation and David Zwirner.

HONG KONG.- David Zwirner is presenting Primary Colors, an exhibition of work by Josef Albers (1888–1976). On view at the gallery’s Hong Kong location, this will be the first solo presentation of Albers’s work in Greater China. Curated by Brenda Danilowitz, chief curator of The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, the show is a focused examination of how the primary colors red, yellow, and blue, along with black, encompassed an infinite range of chromatic possibilities for Albers, which he explored throughout his career in stunning combinations presented in his signature visual formats. The exhibition coincides with a major retrospective exhibition of Albers’s and his wife and fellow artist Anni Albers’s art at the Institut Valencià d’Art Modern (IVAM), Valencia, Spain, which debuted at the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris in 2021. Josef Albers is considered one of … More

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The largest faceted diamond to come to auction. Unveiled at Sotheby’s Dubai. Courtesy Sotheby’s.

DUBAI.- A treasure from interstellar space, “The Enigma”, weighing 555.55 carats, is an exquisite and extremely rare black diamond. The largest Fancy Black Natural Colour diamond in the world, reported by Gubelin and the GIA as of 2004, it was listed as the largest cut diamond in the world in the 2006 Guinness Book of World Records. To have a natural faceted black diamond of this size is an extremely rare occurrence and its origins are shrouded in mystery – thought to have been created either from a meteoric impact or having emerged from a diamond-bearing asteroid that collided with Earth. The design of the diamond is imbued with significance, its shape inspired by the Middle Eastern palm-shaped symbol, the Hamsa – a sign of protection, power and strength. The Hamsa is associated with the number five, which is imbued with symbolic meaning, and the diamond is not only 555.55 carats in size, but it also contains exactly 55 facets – a technical feat for one of the toughest dia … More

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A strong new lead in ‘The Betrayal of Anne Frank’ Custom 1951 Mercury sells at auction for $1.95 million The Eighth Henry: A new gold penny at Spink
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The Betrayal of Anne Frank: A Cold Case Investigation By Rosemary Sullivan. 383 pages. Harper/HarperCollins Publishers. $29.99.

NEW YORK, NY.- The title of Rosemary Sullivan’s important new book, “The Betrayal of Anne Frank,” resounds far beyond its primary meaning. Sullivan is chronicling the investigation of a cold case, the unsolved mystery of who alerted authorities in the summer of 1944 to the hiding place of Frank, her family and four other Jewish people, above a pectin and spice warehouse in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam, resulting in their arrest and deportation to concentration camps. Two official investigations, begun in 1947 and 1963, failed to reveal the identity of the informant; the matter has preoccupied multiple biographers since. Sullivan writes with absolute dedication and precision, bringing a previously obscure suspect to the fore. But Frank, who died at 15 of typhus at Bergen-Belsen days after the death of her sister, Margot, has been betrayed in so many ways. Some would say by having her diaries published at all: … More

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The interior of the Hirohata Merc, a Mercury custom built nearly 70 years ago. Mecum Auctions via The New York Times.

NEW YORK, NY.- A customized 1951 Mercury coupe astonished aficionados over the weekend, selling for $1.95 million at the Mecum collector car auction in Kissimmee, Florida, outpacing the vehicle’s presale estimate of up to $1.25 million. The two-tone green coupe — known as the Hirohata Merc for the 21-year-old Japanese American Navy veteran, Masato Hirohata, who commissioned it in 1952 — is a prime example of the custom car scene that blossomed in Southern California at that time. “This sale is a record for a 1951 Mercury, and the highest-selling custom car that wasn’t a movie or TV show car,” John Wiley, manager of valuation analytics at the classic car insurer Hagerty, said Sunday. “The continuing relevance of the Hirohata Merc thrills us. A car that was customized almost 70 years ago, within the context of an emerging American art form, is still revered today.” Few cars share the Merc’s pedigree. It was built by … More

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This newly discovered Henry III Gold Penny adds but one example to an extremely limited corpus of just eight coins.

LONDON.- Rarely can a single find provoke excitement in English numismatics, fewer still be designated of ‘national significance’. However, once-in-a-blue-moon exceptions must be made, especially when recounting the discoveries of Coenwulf’s Gold Mancus in 2001, and the Edward III ‘Double-Leopard’ in 2006. Spink has had the highest honour of bringing to auction both of these coins, and prides itself in ‘world firsts’ – what a better way to celebrate than with this latest find! Gregory Edmund, Senior Numismatist and Auctioneer at Spink comments ‘we have the immense privilege of celebrating that long-held trust and reputation by auctioning this latest spectacular find en par with those previous magnificent discoveries in a special evening sale on Sunday, 23 January 2022.’ This newly discovered Henry III Gold Penny adds but one example to an extremely limited corpus of just eight coins, and the first additio … More

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Phillips announces launch of fiduciary services branch A library the internet can’t get enough of Chinese artist Wang Gongxin’s first solo exhibition in London opens at White Cube
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New bespoke advisory service to offer support for lawyers, trustees and fiduciaries as they help their clients navigate the art market. Image courtesy of Phillips.

NEW YORK, NY.- Phillips announced the launch of Phillips Fiduciary Services. This new international team will engage with lawyers, trustees and fiduciaries managing high value artworks and collections for their clients by putting at their disposal the combined legal, financial, and art market expertise of the Phillips Legal and Trust and Estates departments. Fiduciaries needing to have a detailed understanding of both the law and practice relating to complex financial arrangements, authenticity and title issues, will be able to look to the Phillips Fiduciary Services Team in handling any questions they may have. Martin Wilson, Chief Legal Counsel and Head of Fiduciary Services, said, “Even for those well-versed in the art market, this landscape can sometimes feel complicated and unfamiliar. Our team includes some of the most experienced art attorneys and estates and appraisals specialists … More

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An undated photo by Will Kirk/Johns Hopkins University of the home library of Prof. Richard Macksey — an image of biblio abundance that regularly makes the rounds in book-loving corners of social media and the internet, drawing comments of awe and delight. Macksey, who passed away in 2019, was a book collector, polyglot and scholar of comparative literature, and the collection, which no longer exists, clocked in at 51,000 titles, according to his son. Will Kirk/Johns Hopkins University via The New York Times.

by Kate Dwyer

NEW YORK, NY.- On the first Tuesday of the year, author and political activist Don Winslow tweeted a photograph of an avid reader’s dream library. Bathed in the buttery glow of three table lamps, almost every surface of the room is covered with books. There are books on the tables, books stacked on mahogany ladders, and books atop still more books lining the shelves of the room. “I hope you see the beauty in this that I do,” Winslow wrote in the tweet, which has been acknowledged with 32,800 hearts. If you spend enough time in the literary corners of Twitter, this image may look familiar. It rises again … More

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Wang Gongxin, Shadow of Light, 2020. Wooden chairs, marble, 3D-printed light bulb, LED light and LED controller, 106 x 106 x 223 cm | 41 3/4 x 41 3/4 x 87 13/16 in. © the artist. Photo © White Cube (Theo Christelis).

LONDON.- White Cube presents ‘In-Between’, the first solo exhibition in London by Chinese artist Wang Gongxin in which the artist expands on the central thesis of Japanese writer Tanizaki Junichiro’s 1933 essay ‘In Praise of Shadows’. In this influential text, the author argued that light is used differently in the East and West: Western cultures looking for illumination and clarity; East Asian cultures embracing shadow and subtlety. Exploring cultural connections between light and mindsets, Wang also interrogates Japanese post-war architect Kurokawa Kisho’s concept of ‘grey space’, where distinctions between inside and outside, artificial and natural, and individual and collective are blurred. Born in 1960 in Beijing, Wang is a pioneering video and media artist, one of the first in China to use digital special effects who, in 1999, founded Loft, the earliest media … More

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‘Holy Grail’ of Disney animation, starring Mickey Mouse, comes to Heritage Auctions Israeli artist turns plastic pollution into ‘Earth Poetica’ Ann Newmarch remembered for her ground-breaking work as a feminist artist, 1945 – 2022
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Black-and-white Shanghaied nitrate production cel setup casts spotlight on Disney’s most iconic character.

DALLAS, TX.- Call it “the Holy Grail for Disney Animation collectors.” Mickey Mouse is, of course, the most iconic Disney character of all time, and the most popular ever created. For more than seven decades, he has appeared in films and in cartoon shorts, in comic books and on a seemingly endless range of merchandise, from clothing to coffee mugs. An extraordinarily rare Shanghaied Mickey Mouse black and white hand inked nitrate Production Cel Setup on its hand-painted Key Master Background will land in a new collection when it is sold in Heritage Auctions’ February 4-7 Animation Art Signature® Auction. “This is an incredible piece that rarely becomes available to the public,” Heritage Auctions Vice President and Animation & Anime Art Director Jim Lentz said. “Mickey Mouse is the most iconic cartoon character of all time, and has been for years. Black-and-white Mickey Mouse production cels with their key master backgroun … More

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In Beverly Barkat’s quest to connect people with nature, she found that environmental waste could be a powerful medium.

by Isabel Kershner

by Isabel Kershner

JERUSALEM.- When Jerusalem artist Beverly Barkat began to create an artwork for the lobby of a building in the new World Trade Center complex overlooking ground zero in lower Manhattan in New York City, she aimed to come up with something architecturally site specific and impactful, large enough to connect with the space but not so enormous as to disconnect from the observer. Barkat had a stark message to convey. Years earlier, she said, she had been struck by an image of children scavenging on a once-beautiful beach awash in plastic waste. “It stayed with me,” she said. “We are suffocating Earth.” Barkat, 55, came back to her studio in Jerusalem and began experimenting, stuffing plastic waste in various … More

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Ann Newmarch, Maralinga: poisoned rations, 1988, Adelaide, oil on canvas, 168.0 x 182.8 cm, Gift of the artist through Art Gallery of the South Australia Contemporary Collectors, 2021, Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, © Ann Newmarch.

The Art Gallery of South Australiahonours the life and career of esteemed South Australian artist Ann Newmarch (born 9 June 1945), who passed away peacefully on Thursday 13 January 2022. Newmarch is celebrated for her significant national and international reputation as an innovative printmaker, painter and sculptor and for her service to community cultural development through art. Embracing feminism and feminist issues since the 1970s, Newmarch was a founding member of the Progressive Art Movement and the Women’s Art Movement and is recognised for her trailblazing work as a feminist and social activist. Newmarch is particularly renowned for her experimental printmaking practice, which she often employed to raise awareness of political issues, gender inequality, environmental … More

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The William K. du Pont Collection: A Holy Grail of Americana
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russel-1.jpgRussell Tovey named as Art UK’s 2022 Patron
LONDON.- Russell Tovey – actor, writer and the co-founder and host of acclaimed podcast Talk Art – is today announced as the 2022 Patron of Art UK, the cultural education charity. The actor succeeds the classicist Dame Mary Beard in supporting Art UK in its mission to democratise access to the nation’s art collection. In addition to providing digital access to the UK’s public art via artuk.org, the charity supports learning with an exciting schools’ resource programme and its online Curations tool, which allows anyone to curate a digital exhibition. Later this year it will launch a major new education programme, The Superpower of Looking. Andrew Ellis, Director of Art UK, says: ‘All of us at Art UK are so thrilled that Russell Tovey will be our Patron in 2022, following in the footsteps of Mary Beard last year. We have watched the success of his Talk Art podcast series over the past three … More

nea-1.jpgWatershed Center for the Ceramic Arts and The Color Network receive $35,000 NEA grant
NEWCASTLE, ME.- Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts and The Color Network are partnering for a second year to offer an artist residency focused on mentor-mentee relationship building among artists of color who work in clay. This summer, sixteen artists who are part of TCN’s mentorship program will gather in person for a two-week residency on Watershed’s 54-acre campus in Edgecomb, Maine. The session will be funded in part by a $35,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. TCN supports artists of color by providing resources, visibility, and professional development opportunities. A significant facet of their work focuses on building mentorship networks among experienced and emerging ceramists. With TCN’s mentors and mentees scattered across the country, most of their connections take place online. As TCN considered ways to bring mentorship program participants … More

elvira-1.jpgDallas Frazier, who wrote hits for country stars, dies at 82
NEW YORK, NY.- Dallas Frazier, a songwriter of great emotional range who wrote No. 1 country hits for Charley Pride, Tanya Tucker and the Oak Ridge Boys, died Friday at a rehabilitation facility in Gallatin, Tennessee, near Nashville. He was 82. His death was confirmed by his daughter Melody Morris, who said he had suffered two strokes since August. Although his most enduring success came in country music, Frazier also wrote pop and R&B hits for artists such as country-soul singer Charlie Rich and Louisiana bluesman Slim Harpo. Both released versions of Frazier’s “Mohair Sam,” a swamp-pop homage to a larger-than-life hipster that, in Rich’s 1965 Top 40 pop version, became one of Elvis Presley’s favorite songs. Frazier’s big break, though, came five years earlier with “Alley Oop,” a novelty song that reached No. 1 on the pop chart (No. 3 on the R&B chart) for the … More

nowisthe-1.jpgNow is the winter of Broadway’s discontent
NEW YORK, NY.- The reopening of Broadway last summer, after the longest shutdown in history, provided a jolt of energy to a city ready for a rebound: Bruce Springsteen and block parties, eager audiences and enthusiastic actors. But the omicron variant of the coronavirus that has barreled into the city, sending case counts soaring, is now battering Broadway, leaving the industry facing an unexpected and enormous setback on its road back from the pandemic. In December, so many theater workers tested positive for the coronavirus that, on some nights, half of all shows were canceled — in a few troublesome instances after audiences were already in their seats. Now, producers have figured out how to keep shows running, thanks mainly to a small army of replacement workers filling in for infected colleagues. Heroic stories abound: When the two girls who alternate as the young lioness … More

steve-1x.jpgSteve Jenkins, 69, dies; His children’s books brought science to life
NEW YORK, NY.- Steve Jenkins, an award-winning children’s book author and illustrator whose passion for science, as well as his meticulous and vibrant cut-paper collages, brought the natural world to life, died Dec. 26 in Boulder, Colorado. He was 69. His wife, Robin Page, said the cause was a splenic artery aneurysm. How many ways can you catch a fly? And who eats flies, anyway? Why do turtles clean hippopotamuses, and how? What do you do if you work at the zoo? What do baby animals do the day they’re born? How do animals talk to each other? How do birds make a nest? His books, often written with Page, answered the sort of questions, posed by children (as well as still-curious grown-ups) about animals and the world around them. Insatiably curious himself, Jenkins combined the rigor of scientific inquiry with exquisite illustrations and clear language to explore subjects … More

egypt-1.jpgA ban on 19 singers in Egypt tests the old guard’s power
CAIRO.- The song starts out like standard fare for Egyptian pop music: a secret infatuation between two young neighbors who, unable to marry, sneak flirtatious glances at each other and commit their hearts in a bittersweet dance of longing and waiting. But then the lyrics take a radical turn. “If you leave me,” blasts the singer, Hassan Shakosh, “I’ll be lost and gone, drinking alcohol and smoking hash.” The song, “The Neighbors’ Daughter,” has become a giant hit, garnering more than a half-billion views of its video on YouTube alone and catapulting Shakosh to stardom. But the explicit reference to drugs and booze, culturally prohibited substances in Egypt, has made the song, released in 2019, a lightning rod in a culture war over what is an acceptable face and subject matter for popular music and who gets to decide. The battle, which pits Egypt’s cultural establishment against a … More

newbook-1.jpgNew book offers a fascinating account of the story of the Yves Saint Laurent Museum in Marrakech
PARIS.- Phaidon presents Yves Saint Laurent Museum Marrakech, the remarkable story of the landmark museum in Marrakech dedicated to the legendary French fashion designer’s creative work. The book chronicles the unique collaboration between Saint Laurent’s partner, Pierre Bergé, and architecture firm Studio KO, taking readers behind the scenes on a creative journey at the intersection of architecture, design, and fashion. Yves Saint Laurent (1936-2008) – the last of the grand couturiers – famously found inspiration and refuge in Marrakech, Morocco’s “pink city,” where he and Bergé owned a six-acre compound including a residence, Villa Oasis, and accompanying Majorelle Garden. “Marrakech taught me colour,” Saint Laurent once said. … More

quentin-1.jpgQuentin Blake touring exhibition opens at Kirkby Gallery
LIVERPOOL.- The first ever exhibition dedicated to Quentin Blake’s illustrations for poetry, with works selected by the artist himself, opened at Kirkby Gallery in Knowsley. Sir Quentin Blake has been illustrating poetry throughout his 60-year career, creating illustrations for such varied poets as Roald Dahl and William Shakespeare. Quentin Blake: Illustrating Verse brings together a selection of more than 120 of Blake’s illustrations for poetry of all kinds, from comic nonsense poems to poignant ballads. The exhibition celebrates Blake’s illustrations for popular nursery rhymes like The Owl and the Pussycat and famous poems like The Jabberwocky, while also shining a light on less well-known works for the likes of Sylvia Plath and T. S. Eliot. The show includes roughs, preliminary sketches and finished artworks for both modern and classical writers, from Edward Lear and Lewis … More

antonio-1.jpgAntonio Santín’s ornamental rug paintings on view at Marc Straus
NEW YORK, NY.- This exhibition marks the 10th anniversary of Antonio Santín’s first solo show at Marc Straus. Building on his well-known work of traditional ornamental rug paintings, the Madrid based painter Antonio Santín continues to expand his artistic vocabulary. His masterful use of art historical painting techniques such as chiaroscuro and trompe l’oeil are combined with his signature three-dimensional application of minuscule oil paint marks. The entire canvas becomes dense with colors capturing the rich ornamentation of luxurious carpets. But unlike the actual carpet, which has a flat surface, Santín now layers the oil. Flower buds open up in 3-dimension, and the knots tying the white fringe on the periphery are raised and shaped as real knots are. Vertical cords of paint appear woven. The application of paint is as detailed as threads are. His unique paint application not only … More

agrand-1.jpgA grand Miami Beach hotel, and its history, might be torn down
MIAMI BEACH, FLA.- The baby-faced Beatles spent nine sun-kissed days here in 1964, basking in the warm winter as thousands of young fans thronged to catch a glimpse of the four Liverpool lads enjoying a bit of freedom on the ocean shore. They stayed at the grand Deauville Beach Resort on Collins Avenue, and it was their live “Ed Sullivan Show” broadcast to 70 million people from the hotel’s Napoleon Ballroom — after their debut show in New York City — that helped cement the Beatles’ extraordinary popularity in the United States, and the Deauville’s status as a South Florida cultural landmark. In its heyday, the hotel hosted the likes of Sammy Davis Jr., President John F. Kennedy and Frank Sinatra. The Deauville was unmistakable, greeting visitors with a dramatic porte-cochere fashioned of parabolic curves over the driveway entrance, a feature of its postwar … More

bary-1.jpgBaryshnikov Arts Center to return to live performance in spring
NEW YORK, NY.- The Baryshnikov Arts Center will return to in-person performances this spring after two years of online programming. The season features eight dance and music performances, with three presented virtually. The streamed performances are a part of the center’s commissioning program, which began in fall 2020 as a way of sustaining the organization and encouraging artists to continue creating during the pandemic. Cora Cahan, the center’s president and chief executive, said the delay in the return to live performances was because of the postponement during the pandemic of a long-planned replacement of its building’s heating, ventilation and cooling systems. “We’re going very slowly and carefully here because we’re moving back to having audiences on site for the first time in so long,” Cahan said. “We’re thrilled to be planning for live performances … More

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Flashback
On a day like today, English fashion designer and photographer Cecil Beaton died
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January 18, 1980. Sir Cecil Walter Hardy Beaton CBE (14 January 1904 – 18 January 1980) was an English fashion, portrait and war photographer, diarist, painter, interior designer and an Academy Award–winning stage and costume designer for films and the theatre. In this image: Marylin Monroe. © Sotheby’s Cecil Beaton Archive.

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Paula Modersohn-Becker’s Best Artworks, Controversy Over Rijksmuseum Indonesia Show, and the Week’s Top Stories

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JANUARY 14, 2022

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5 Works to Know by Paula Modersohn-Becker, the ‘First Modern Woman Artist’

BY ALEX GREENBERGER

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Use of ‘Racist’ Term in Rijksmuseum Indonesia Show Provokes Controversy

BY ALEX GREENBERGER

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Israel’s Ramat Gan Museum Closes Amid Censorship Dispute

BY ANGELICA VILLA

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“Artist Talks: January/February 2022 Exhibitions” at Artspace, Richmond, Virginia

“Social Fabrics: Inscribed Textiles from Medieval Egyptian Tombs” at Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, Massachusetts

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Documenta Responds to Allegations of ‘Anti-Semitic’ Connections to BDS Movement

BY ALEX GREENBERGER

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Rare Roman Wooden Figure Unearthed in England During Construction of New Rail Line

BY ANDY BATTAGLIA

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Protestor Vandalizes Eric Gill Statue Outside BBC, Sparking Debate Over Sculptor’s Sordid Biography

BY TESSA SOLOMON

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Long-Unseen Marsden Hartley Painting Resurfaces After Decades in Bank Vault

BY MAXIMILÍANO DURÓN

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Ancient Rock Art in Texas ‘Irreparably Damaged’ by Vandals

BY ALEX GREENBERGER

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$60 M. Magritte Painting from Muse’s Collection Could Set New Auction Record

BY ANGELICA VILLA

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Art Historian Discovers Painting He Bought for £65 May Be the Work of Anthony van Dyck

BY TESSA SOLOMON

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ArtDaily Newsletter: Monday, Jan 17, 2022

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The First Art Newspaper on the Net facebook.png twitter.png instagram.png Established in 1996 Monday, January 17, 2022
Facing violence with brushes and ballots
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In an image provided by the Greene Naftali gallery, “brechen, brach, gebrochen, du brichst, bricht, brich! (to break, broke, broken, you break, breaks, break!) and einsperren (to lock someone up),” a work by Paul Chan created after the insurrection at the Capitol. On January 6, many artists shared the belief that they should respond to a national trauma. But how? Courtesy Greene Naftali, New York via The New York Times.

by Travis Diehl

NEW YORK, NY.- Late in the evening on Jan. 5, dozens of art-world insiders received a fundraising message from Nancy Pelosi. “I’m in disbelief,” the text began. “Tomorrow is the anniversary of the violent, deadly insurrection on our nation’s capitol, and several reports show Republicans surging in the run-up to the midterms. We need to send a strong message that our democracy is sacred.” The message was typical enough of the calls to arms blasted by progressive campaigns and organizers such as ActBlue and MoveOn. But then, the kicker: “That’s why I need you to show up at the opening of artist Paul Chan’s new exhibition at Greene Naftali Gallery, tomorrow …” “Pelosi” then recited the news release for Chan’s new show. It turns out the text was a joke. But the subtext was not. The storming of the Capitol was too dire to ignore, with a half-dozen lives lost, traumatized police and hundreds of rioters facing criminal charges. Chan, an a … More

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The Best Photos of the Day
Best Photos of the Day
Installation view of Alec Soth: A Pound of Pictures at Sean Kelly, New York January 14 – February 26, 2022. Photography: Cooper Dodds. Courtesy: Sean Kelly, New York.

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Exhibition presents recent unique prints made at the visionary print studio Two Palms Exhibition brings together significant works from 1978 to 2018 by Ettore Spalletti Exclusive Palmer Museum of Art exhibition explores evolution of abstraction in the 1940s
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Dana Schutz, Baggage, 2021 © Dana Schutz. Courtesy the artist and Two Palms, NY.

NEW YORK, NY.- David Zwirner is presenting Unrepeated: Unique Prints from Two Palms, an exhibition of recent unique prints made at the visionary print studio Two Palms, at the gallery’s 537 West 20th Street location in New York. This selection includes works by Marina Adams, Mel Bochner, Cecily Brown, Peter Doig, Carroll Dunham, Chris Ofili, Elizabeth Peyton, Dana Schutz, Stanley Whitney, and Terry Winters. Two Palms has been at the vanguard of experimental printmaking processes since it was established in 1994 by David Lasry in downtown New York. With an array of specialized tools and equipment, such as its rare hydraulic press, the studio has championed the creation of monoprints and monotypes—which Lasry sees as “perhaps the most diverse and dynamic of all the print mediums.”1 The exhibition is a fitting collaboration with Lasry, a longtime friend of the gallery, who has worked with numerous David Zwirner artists and ot … More

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Ettore Spalletti, Così com’è, fonte, 2006. Color impasto on resin, water basin. Height: 51 3/8 in. (130.5 cm) Upper diameter: 14 7/8 in. (37.7 cm) Lower diameter: 10 in. (25.3 cm).

NEW YORK, NY.- Marian Goodman Gallery is presenting a solo presentation by Ettore Spalletti (1940 – 2019), which brings together significant works from 1978 to 2018. The exhibition, the first presentation of his work in the New York gallery, is on view from Tuesday, January 11 through Saturday, 5 March. “Since 1974, Spalletti has been interested in the system of color effects that provoke a series of questions about the rigid order of forms and volumes, shifting attention from the surface of painted images to the painting of surfaces of objects.” — Germano Celant The exhibition features paintings, sculpture and works on paper that trace a path through the themes and preoccupations that drove the artist’s intimate and poetic practice. Moving between mediums, Spalletti explores the threshold between interior and exterior, painting and sculpture, works that open outwards … More

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Lee Krasner (American, 1908–1984), Composition, 1949, oil on canvas, 38 1/16 x 27 13/16 inches. Philadelphia Museum of Art: Gift of the Aaron E. Norman Fund, Inc., 1959, 1959-31-1 © 2021 Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

UNIVERSITY PARK, PA.- A captivating new exhibition premiering at the Palmer Museum of Art at Penn State this month considers how some of the most provocative midcentury artists made the leap from figuration to abstraction. A Way Through: Abstract Art of the 1940s features major works by Suzy Frelinghuysen, Arshile Gorky, Paul Keene, Lee Krasner, Alice Trumbull Mason, Henry McCarter, George L. K. Morris, Irene Rice Pereira, Judith Rothschild, Charles Green Shaw, Esphyr Slobodkina, Hedda Sterne and John von Wicht. Many of these artists – including a significant number of women, whose contributions have too often been overlooked – were pivotal founders and early members of the American Abstract Artists group. The exhibition is organized by the Palmer … More

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Vintage work mixes with new images in new exhibition at Janet Borden Inc. Exhibition brings together images Alec Soth completed between 2018 and 2021 Sherrill Roland’s first exhibition with Tanya Bonakdar Gallery on view in New York
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Neil Winokur, Cosmo.

BROOKLYN, NY.- Janet Borden Inc. is presenting a new exhibition, Places, Faces, Traces. A wonderful range of talent is showcased in this exhibition, vintage work mixing with new images, creating a conversation among artists whose work addresses some of the most compelling aspects of photography. Included in the exhibition are gallery artists and a few ringers. The great quality of a group exhibition is that it presents an artist’s work in dialog with others. Seeing these works side by side permits a whole new understanding for their subtleties and visual language. It is a curatorial privilege and challenge to present work in a new context. The exhibition commences with David Brandon Geeting’s “Shadow Ice,”a visual meditation on water, from his series Neighborhood Stroll. Geeting has abstracted a mundane view of a windowsill into literal cliffhanger. This piece is paired with John Pfahl’s 1977 … More

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Installation view of Alec Soth: A Pound of Pictures at Sean Kelly, New York, January 14 – February 26, 2022. Photography: Cooper Dodds. Courtesy: Sean Kelly, New York.

NEW YORK, NY.- Sean Kelly opened A Pound of Pictures, Alec Soth’s fourth solo exhibition at the gallery. This new body of work brings together images Soth completed between 2018 and 2021. As is often his custom, Soth began A Pound of Pictures by taking a series of road trips, in this case on a quest to further explore a deeper connection between the ephemerality and physicality of photography as a medium. Depicting a vast array of subjects — from Buddhist statues and birdwatchers to sun-seekers and a bust of Abraham Lincoln — this series reflects on the photographic desire to pin down and crystallize experience, especially as it is represented and recollected by printed images. Throughout this kaleidoscopic sequence of images runs the iconography of daily life: souvenirs, … More

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Sherrill Roland, 168.807, 2021. Steel, enamel, Kool-Aid, acrylic medium, epoxy resin, 41 x 49 x 9 inches; 104.1 x 124.5 x 22.9 cm. Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles.

NEW YORK, NY.- Tanya Bonakdar Gallery is presenting Hindsight Bias, Sherrill Roland’s first exhibition with the gallery, on view in New York from January 8 through February 5, 2022. Sherrill Roland’s interdisciplinary practice deals with concepts of innocence, identity, and community, often filtered through minimalist gestures, specific materials, and various layers of abstraction. For more than three years, Roland’s right to self-determination was lost to wrongful incarceration. He spent ten months in prison before being exonerated and returning to an artistic practice that developed into a vehicle for expression, reflection, and emotional release. The title Hindsight Bias references how we process memories using acquired wisdom and knowledge. In his work, Roland examines how his own … More

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20 years later, the story behind the Guantánamo photo that won’t go away Bonhams’ inaugural anime sale offers rare original works from beloved classics One indelible scene: When a woman takes the wheel in ‘Licorice Pizza’
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A Jan. 11, 2002, photo taken by Shane T. McCoy and released by the U.S. Navy shows the first 20 prisoners at Guantánamo Bay in Cuba soon after their arrival. Petty Officer 1st Class Shane T. McCoy/U.S. Navy via The New York Times.

by Carol Rosenberg

GUANTÁNAMO BAY.- Four months to the day after the Sept. 11 attacks, a photographer hoisted a camera above shiny new razor wire and took a picture of 20 prisoners on their knees in orange uniforms, manacled, masked and heads bowed. The image ignited a debate over what the United States was doing at its offshore prison, which continues operating to this day. It also became one of the most enduring, damning photos of U.S. detention policy in the 21st century. But lost in time and collective memory to many is that the picture was not some leaked image of torture that the public was not meant to see. It was taken by a U.S. Navy photographer, intentionally released by the Defense Department. … More

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Kiki’s Delivery Service, Kiki and Jiji, Anime Production Cel. Photo: Bonhams.

NEW YORK, NY.- Spanning Anime classics with the likes of Astro Boy, Sailor Moon, and Pokémon, Bonhams’ first World of Anime online sale is set to go live January 24th – February 2nd and will include more than 150 rare Anime production cels and drawings. Relics of the pre-digital animation era, the production of Anime originally was done one frame at a time by hand-painting sheets of celluloid (production cels) and then layering them to create the effect of continuous motion. These production cels allow fans to own a tangible part of the most recognizable Anime in the world. Leading the inaugural sale is a production cel featuring the titular character of Kiki’s Delivery Service with her companion Jiji, estimated at $15,000 – 25,000. This standout gouache on celluloid work is from the studio of Hayao Miyazaki, a pioneering animation filmmaker. Created and originally released by Studio Ghibli in 1989, Kiki’s Delivery Service was t … More

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After letting Alana Haim and her character drift and idle, Paul Thomas Anderson gives you a reason to cheer: “Hardcore, hardcore Alana!” Josefina Santos/The New York Times.

by Manohla Dargis

NEW YORK, NY.- In the final stretch of Paul Thomas Anderson’s “Licorice Pizza,” rocker-turned-film-goddess Alana Haim climbs into the driver’s seat of a truck and takes off with the movie. Her character — a rootless adult also named Alana — has been meandering through the story, which takes place in 1973. For reasons known only to Anderson, Alana has been hanging out with Gary (Cooper Hoffman), an operator, recently turned 16, whose latest hustle is selling water beds. They need to deliver a bed to a customer, but since Gary isn’t yet driving, Alana is the one behind the wheel. Specifically, Alana is operating a Ford truck, a hulking six-wheeler with the front painted an incongruously sporty orange and blue. It’s a featured player in my … More

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James Cohan opens ‘A Través’, a group exhibition Camden Art Centre opens Julien Creuzet’s first institutional exhibition in the UK Sotheby’s Masters Week spans millennia of art history with $40 million Botticelli masterpiece
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Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Drop Scene Study (0X5A1121), 2018. Archival pigment print, 75 x 50″ [HxW] (190.5 x 127 cm) print size; 76 x 51 x 2″ [HxWxD] (193.04 x 129.54 x 5.08 cm) framed. Edition 1 of 5, 2 AP.

NEW YORK, NY.- James Cohan is presenting A Través, a group exhibition on view from January 14 through February 19, 2022, at 52 Walker Street. Collectively and individually, we pass through thresholds, periods of transitions, and states of indeterminacy in life. In the middle stage between birth and death, there is a “cloud of unknowing,” the Romantic idea of a psychic space with no boundaries; at once freeing and equally anxiety-provoking. If ever there was a time when ambiguity and disorientation are shared sensations, it is now. This exhibition is a meditation on this transitory state. Through performance, sculpture, painting, photography and film, the artists presented offer glimpses into these subconscious states as they play out in figuration. Teresa Margolles’ … More

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Installation view.

LONDON.- As the second recipient of Camden Art Centre’s Emerging Artist Prize at Frieze, French-Caribbean artist Julien Creuzet (b. 1986 France) presents a new installation commissioned especially for Gallery 3. This is his first institutional exhibition in the UK. Born in a Parisian banlieue, Creuzet grew up in Martinique and now lives and works in Paris. He places his own lived experience at the heart of his practice whilst allowing the work to shine a light on collective social realities of the Caribbean diaspora, focusing on the troubled intersection between Caribbean histories and the events of European modernity. Creuzet describes his ancestral home, Martinique, as “the heart of my imagination” and the visual and aural languages that collide in his installations migrate and transform through a process of creolisation, entering into a dialogue with the question of emancipation, a spirit of black affirmation and the fe … More

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Egyptian Limestone Figure of a Man from circa 2440-2355 B.C, est. $3/5 million. Courtesy Sotheby’s.

NEW YORK, NY.- This January, Sotheby’s will offer a rich selection of Old Master paintings, drawings and sculpture by some of the most celebrated names in European art history during its marquee Masters Week sale series, starting on 26 January. Gathered from some of the greatest private collections in the world, the sales will be headlined by Renaissance master Sandro Botticelli’s arresting Man of Sorrows, a seminal masterpiece of the Florentine artist’s late career, estimated in excess of $40 million. A touching portrayal of Christ, recent technical analysis in preparation for the sale has revealed an earlier composition of a Madonna and Child hidden beneath the painting, unseen to the naked eye till now. Alongside masterpieces and newly discovered works from the 14th to 19th centuries, this season’s sale series will also include, for the first … More

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Lowery Stokes Sims l Curator and Art Historian | Met Stories
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faroese-1.jpgExhibition looks at the importance of light and how its treatment has evolved in Faroese art
PARIS.- From 14 January to 13 March 2022, the Maison du Danemark’s arts space Le Bicolore, on the Champs-Élysées, in Paris, is hosting a major exhibition. “As the sun bursts through” looks at the importance of light and how its treatment has evolved in Faroese art of the 20th and 21st centuries via figurative and abstract artworks by Ingálvur av Reyni (1920-2005), Zacharias Heinesen (born in 1936), Hansina Iversen (born in 1966) and Rannvá Kunoy (born in 1975). In tandem with the exhibition, there will be a packed programme of accompanying events encompassing music, literature, cinema, design, gastronomy and folk art. Probably because, for centuries, their position on the fringe of the north Atlantic kept them relatively isolated, in the Faroe Islands, age-old customs have remained living traditions. Faroese society blends traditional and … More

carp-1.jpgSouth African artist Kendell Geers opens an exhibition at Carpenters Worksop Gallery
PARIS.- From the Flash to the Flesh, something is dismantled in Kendell Geers. The spirit no longer describes a common inspiration; it calls towards phenomena that are difficult to explain, like a poltergeist – a spirit that strikes. Once the spirit becomes flesh, the false merges with the true, the unity of reference breaks down. A space opens up to explore, to play with strangeness, false recognition and false perceptions – disorders of identity. What is “African art”? Does it consist of tangible plastic similarities? Or even, to put it like Leopold Senghor, the first president of Senegal, does it express the unity of a spirituality, of a philosophy? On a support-mirror, an immense bronze sculpture: a woman without hands, whose forms echo the fabulous idea of an ancient African statuary that remains undefined. She is surrounded by eight bronze masks, placed … More

leading-1.jpgLeading bookseller’s private collection goes up for sale
NEW YORK, NY.- William Reese, a leading rare-book dealer who died in 2018, left his stamp on private and institutional collections across the country, representing major libraries at auctions and shaping the tastes of a generation of collectors who visited his appointment-only shop in New Haven, Connecticut. But there was another Reese trove that far fewer people got to see: his private library. Christie’s will be selling that personal collection in a series of auctions starting in May, in what it is calling the most significant sale of printed Americana in more than half a century and one of the most valuable single-owner book auctions ever. The collection, which is being sold in about 700 lots, carries a total estimate of $12 million to $18 million, which Christina Geiger, the auction house’s head of books and manuscripts, described as “conservative.” Highlights — … More

annet-1.jpgAnnet Gelink Gallery opens the group show ‘Blindenzimmer’
AMSTERDAM.- Annet Gelink Gallery is presenting the group show Blindenzimmer, with work by Yael Bartana, David Claerbout, Roger Hiorns, Meiro Koizumi, Rezi van Lankveld, Erik van Lieshout, Sarah van Sonsbeeck, Wilfredo Prieto, Johannes Schwartz, Dick Verdult and Marijke van Warmerdam. Blindenzimmer explores the metaphorical circus of our current societal and political state, whose reality highlights both the sublime and the absurd of the human condition. Titled after Johannes Schwartz’ series of the same name, which documents the interiors of blind people’s homes, the show delves into the inwardness of this surreal moment. Looking at visitors under a mask of bright makeup, Dick Verdult’s Very Very Said welcomes them in the gallery space. With subtle irony, Verdult investigates the state of current events through the figure of the clown. Aware … More

towers-1.jpgTowers rise over London’s Brick Lane, clouding its future
LONDON.- Ornate English and Bengali typography adorns the signs of Taj Stores, one of the oldest Bangladeshi-run supermarkets in the Brick Lane neighborhood of East London. The signs evoke a part of the area’s past, when it became known as “Banglatown,” and eventually home to the largest Bangladeshi community in Britain. But Brick Lane’s future is looking very uncertain, said Jamal Khalique, standing inside a supermarket opened in 1936 by his great-uncle and now run by Khalique and his two brothers. Modern office buildings of glass and steel and a cluster of apartments and cranes tower above the skyline. New coffee shops, restaurants, food markets and hotels appear in the neighborhood each year. According to one study, the borough of Tower Hamlets, which contains Brick Lane, had the most gentrification in London from 2010 … More

thierry-1.jpgKenechukwu Victor’s first in-person solo exhibition with Thierry Goldberg opens in New York
NEW YORK, NY.- Thierry Goldberg is presenting “Let there be Light, Let there be White,” Kenechukwu Victor’s first in-person solo exhibition with the gallery, following his online solo exhibition this summer, Eziokwu (UndilutedTruths). The exhibition runs from January 15th through February 19th, 2022. “Let There Be Light, Let There Be White” continues Kenechukwu Victor’s passion for storytelling through portraiture. Utilizing a pallet of vibrant hues, Victor exposes personal perspectives on the realities of Nigerian life. His figures transcend from their surrounding environments, their lips and hair painted Victor’s signature white, alluding to the Nzu tradition symbolizing truth, purity, and peace. Each portrait functions as its own narrative, resulting in an exhibition that resounds in a cacophony of stories, memories, and experiences. Drawing influence … More

signs-1.jpgsigns and symbols opens its first solo exhibition of works by Adam Broomberg
NEW YORK, NY.- signs and symbols is presenting Glitter in My Wounds. For his first solo exhibition at the gallery, Adam Broomberg invites CAConrad and Gersande Spelsberg as his collaborators. The exhibition presents a selection of hand printed, photographic portraits of the trans activist and actress Gersande Spelsberg taken by Broomberg, accompanied by a sound piece featuring Spelsberg’s voice and CAConrad’s poetics. Spelsberg’s story of transitioning reflects on and questions the many toxic pre-existing conditions that shape contemporary gender roles, further informed by CAConrad’s poetry on confronting identities that had previously felt fixed and immutable. Adam Broomberg has long been fascinated by the binary positions of two photographers from the 20th Century — the famous Weimar Republic photographer, August Sander, and … More

nara-1.jpgNara Roesler New York opens a retrospective of Brazilian artist Abraham Palatnik
NEW YORK, NY.- Abraham Palatnik (1928–2020) is a monumental figure in Latin American art. Arguably the author of the earliest mechanical experiments with movement and color, giving him a pioneering position among practitioners of Op Art in the Americas, Palatnik is a complex creator who bridged technology and art, energy and color, function and ornament, nature and movement within his work. Born in Brazil to parents who emigrated from Ukraine at the beginning of twentieth century, Palatnik moved in his early childhood to Palestine, remaining there until 1948. Trained as an artist and engineer there, he began to work influenced by both the School of Paris and Modern Bauhaus-like ideas. But it was his experience at the National Center of Psychiatry in Rio de Janeiro, led by Nise da Silveira alongside peers such as Amir Mavignier … More

newlight-1.jpgNew light installation near Old Street roundabout opens bright window to a dark future
LONDON.- At first glance, it looks like any ordinary high street shop but the signs in the window at 103 Murray Grove aren’t offering manicures or replacement phone screens. From interplanetary money transfer services to fast food made from insect protein, these garishly colourful signs flash and blink a hi-tech vision of the future rendered in low-tech LEDs. London-based visual artist and designer Simon the Last has taken over the entire front window of a retail unit near London’s Silicon Roundabout with his new work WE WILL STILL BE HERE / WILL WE STILL BE HERE. The eye-catching installation features 10 illuminated LED shop window signs arranged in a single shopfront and imagines which products and services might be available “while-u-wait” 50 years from now. It presents today’s cutting edge technology as cheap, pedestrian … More

rady-1.jpgJanet Rady Fine Art opens new online exhibition Carnivals of Clouds
LONDON.- Janet Rady Fine Art is presenting Carnivals of Clouds, a group exhibition of international artists, featuring Alice Macdonald, Beatrice Hassell-McCosh, Blessing Ngobeni, Iain Andrews, Jade van der Mark, Kerry Louise Bennett, Koshiro Akiyama, Lindsey Jean McClean, Orla Murray and Yann Leto. As the name of the exhibition suggests, Carnival of Clouds is inspired in part by Emily Dickinson’s poem, “Heaven” has different signs – to me”, which comments on our boundless capacity for awe and wonder found in in human relationships, the natural world, and quotidian happenings in our surrounding environment. At once playful, imaginative and evocative, the works reflect the necessity of expression and the lived experience that resonates through us all, while also embodying a psychological tone. Bringing together ten artists from across … More

weisman-1.jpgExhibition presents highlights from the Kinsey African American Art and History Collection
MALIBU, CA.- Pepperdine University’s Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art presents the exhibition The Cultivators: Highlights from the Kinsey African American Art and History Collection, featuring masterful works of art, photographs, rare books, letters, and manuscripts that chronicle the achievements and contributions of African Americans over the last five centuries. Curated by Khalil Kinsey and Larry Earl, The Cultivators includes some of the collection’s signature objects, which have traveled the globe to more than 30 venues over the last 15 years, along with works that have never before been shown publicly. Marking the first hometown presentation of the Kinsey Collection since 2007, The Cultivators is on view at the Weisman Museum of Art from January 15 to March 27, 2022, and will be accompanied by a full slate of public programs, including … More

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PhotoGalleries
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Golden Shells and the Gentle Mastery of Japanese Lacquer

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Imants Tillers

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Le Design Pour Tous

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New Galleries of Dutch and Flemish Art

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Flashback
On a day like today, Italian painter Antonio del Pollaiuolo was born
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January 17, 1429. Antonio del Pollaiuolo (17 January 1429/1433 – 4 February 1498), also known as Antonio di Jacopo Pollaiuolo or Antonio Pollaiuolo (also spelled Pollaiolo), was an Italian painter, sculptor, engraver and goldsmith during the Italian Renaissance. In this image: Assunzione di Santa Maria Maddalena.

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ArtDaily Newsletter: Friday, Jan 14, 2022

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The First Art Newspaper on the Net facebook.png twitter.png instagram.png Established in 1996 Friday, January 14, 2022
New details discovered in restoration of 400-year-old winter landscape
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Hendrick Avercamp, restauratie IJsgezicht (1610-1620). Aanbrengen retouches. Photo: Aad Hoogendoorn.

ROTTERDAM.- Over the past year, the painting ‘Scene on the Ice’ (1610-1620) by Hendrick Avercamp (1585-1634) from the collection of Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen has been thoroughly restored, revealing the painting’s fresh colours and bringing to light surprising details. This week, the museum has posted a short video online about the restoration of the work. But even after making the film, the restorer Johanneke Verhave made another remarkable discovery when she realised that what had previously been mistaken for reeds was in fact a gallows field. Thanks to the extensive conservation work, the painting is now ready for the future. ‘Scene of the Ice’ is on view in the exhibition ‘Maritime Masterpieces’ in Rotterdam’s Maritime Museum until 4 September. The restoration of Avercamp’s ‘Scene on the Ice’ was made possible by Stichting Droom en Daad as part of ‘Boijmans Next Door’. The short video … More

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The Best Photos of the Day
Best Photos of the Day
The Perspective Gallery, Evanston, IL is presenting “Through A New Lens”, an exhibition of photographs by seven internationally-recognized iPhoneographers. The exhibition, curated by museum professional, art historian and photographer, Gina Costa, demonstrates a broad range of styles and approaches used by mobile technology. In this image: Gina Costa and Stephen Murphy.

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2021 is Hindman Auctions’ best year in 39-year history Christie’s offers the private collection of book dealer William S. Reese New book offers a fresh interpretation of Paul Nash’s career through the lens of his design and illustration work
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Martin Wong (American, 1946-1999), Persuit (El Que Gane Pierde – He Who Wins Looses), 1984 (detail). Sold for $1,100,000.

CHICAGO, IL.- 2021 was a year of records at Hindman Auctions. The auction firm reported $87 million in total sales for the year, its highest total by a wide margin in the company’s 39-year history, setting over 30 individual auction records along the way. The year demonstrated not only the strength of the current auction market, but the success of Hindman’s investment in technology and its client-focused approach. “Over the five years I have been lucky to be with Hindman, our business has more than doubled in size,” said Jay Frederick Krehbiel, Hindman’s CEO. “Building on the extraordinary legacy of our founders, Leslie Hindman and Wes Cowan, we have redoubled our efforts to be the most client-centric firm possible and I was thrilled to see our clients respond so enthusiastically this year.” Hindman began 2021 by rolling out its Digital Bid Room, a proprietary online and mobile live bidding platform that al … More

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A rare, contemporary broadside edition of the Declaration of Independence, John Rodgers, 15 or 16 July 1776. Estimate: $1,000,000-1,500,000. © Christie’s Images Ltd 2022.

NEW YORK, NY.- Christie’s will present The Private Collection of William S. “Bill” Reese. The late Bill Reese was renowned as the foremost dealer-scholar of antiquarian books of his generation, and his private collection will be among the most valuable sales of printed Americana in over 50 years. With the rich combination of printed works, historic prints, fine art, and color-plate books, this stands as one of the most visually beautiful collections of Americana to ever come to auction. A series of themed live and online auctions will be held in New York beginning May 25 and September, and highlights of the collection will be unveiled to the public during Christie’s Americana Week exhibition January 13-28. Christie’s exhibitions mark the first time in over 30 years that any portion of the current collection has been publicly exhibited. With approximately 700 lots, the collection has a total pre- … More

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Paul Nash: Designer and Illustrator by James King. Price: £29.95/$59.99. Hardback. 216 pages, 120 colour and 40 black & white. ISBN: 978 1 84822 445 2

LONDON.- Exploring the ways in which painting, applied design and illustration intertwined over the course of the accomplished career of Paul Nash (1889-1946), this book provides a new perspective on one of the most gifted and celebrated English artists of the twentieth century. Skilfully navigating the diversity of Nash’s design output, which drew in illustration, book jackets, posters, set design, pattern papers, fabrics, glass, ceramics and photography, in the context of Nash’s painting and wider pre-occupations, James King presents an artist who strove to resolve his artistic vision. With Nash’s work informed by seismic shifts within the visual arts during his lifetime – from the influence of the Arts and Crafts Movement on the one hand, to Surrealism and Abstraction on the other – this fascinating book reveals the considerable gifts that allowed Nash to create … More

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Exhibition brings two renowned collections together for the first time Friedman Benda opens an exhibition dedicated to Creative Salvage furniture Two-part NFT exhibition fuses art and technology: Poetic Enigma
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Michael Armitage, Sun Wukong in Gachie, 2015. Courtesy the Roberts Institute of Art and the David and Indrė Roberts Collection. Photo: Stephen White. © Michael Armitage.

GLASGOW.- The Roberts Institute of Art and The Hunterian, University of Glasgow are pleased to announce a collaborative exhibition in which works by artists who have evoked bodily experiences – often in response to the impacts of technology, spirituality or mortality – are exhibited together for the first time. Artists featured in Flesh Arranges Itself Differently from The Hunterian and the David and Indrė Roberts Collection, managed by the Roberts Institute of Art, include Rita Ackermann, Christine Borland, Ilana Halperin, Tamara Henderson, Loie Hollowell, Yayoi Kusama, Liliane Lijn, Eduardo Paolozzi, Robert Rauschenberg, Michael E. Smith and Danh Vō among others. The exhibition will also include remarkable anatomical drawings from The Hunterian collection. The exhibition is jointly curated by Ned McConnell, Curator, RIA and Dominic Paterson, Curator, The Hunterian, and will take place at The Hunterian … More

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Deborah Thomas, Blue Flame, Wall Light Installation, 1987.

NEW YORK, NY.- Friedman Benda is presenting its eighth annual guest-curated exhibition, Accidents Will Happen: Creative Salvage, 1981–1991. Curated by Gareth Williams, who co-authored Cut & Shut: The History of Creative Salvage with Nick Wright, the exhibition showcases key works from an often overlooked but highly influential period of British design that exploded out of 1980s London. The exhibition, the first international presentation dedicated to Creative Salvage furniture, showcases early and important works from key figures, many of whom have gone on to become leading household names. Featuring works by Ron Arad, Mark Brazier-Jones, Tom Dixon, André Dubreuil, Danny Lane, Jon Mills and Deborah Thomas, Accidents Will Happen: Creative Salvage, 1981–1991 captures a critical moment in the course of recent design history and charts its exciting narrative through a wealth of contemporary archival material. Against the backdrop of a … More

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Peng Jian, Harmony X #2/5, 2020. NFT Edition of 5, 1 minute 30 seconds video. Courtesy of Ora-Ora and the artist.

HONG KONG.- Ora-Ora is presenting an exciting two-part exhibition of leading-edge Non-Fungible Token (‘NFT’) artworks, entitled Poetic Enigma. Poetic Enigma I is already open at Q9 Crypto Hub until January 21, featuring NFT innovators such as Peng Jian, Cindy Ng and Ernest Chang among others. The venue for Poetic Enigma II is Ora-Ora’s Tai Kwun gallery space, where it will run from January 17 to February 13. Poetic Enigma alludes to a tendency to romanticize that which we do not understand or cannot directly experience, giving full rein to the attractions of mystery, the unattainable and the unrequited. Fast technological change habitually stands in opposition to this tendency, often provoking feelings of disturbance, disorientation or resentment outside the circle of trusted initiates. Poetic Enigma places innovation in our immediate and familiar orbit. In so doing, it invites visitors to dispel suspicion and give way to naivety, … More

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The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts announces fall 2021 grantees and new website It started with a kiss. Then film scholars found more. MOCA announces Amy Hood as Chief Communications Officer
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CALA Alliance: Crossfade LAB with Lido Pimiento and Carolina Caycedo, Crescent Ballroom, Phoenix, Arizona. Image courtesy of CALA Alliance, photograph by Alonso Parra, Lamp Left.

NEW YORK, NY.- The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has announced the recipients of its Fall 2021 grants. A total of $4.1 million will be awarded to 49 organizations to support the vital work of artists in communities around the country. Grant recipients will be profiled on the Foundation’s new website, which was developed by multidisciplinary design firm Wkshps to bring greater visibility to the Foundation’s philanthropic work and its stewardship of Warhol’s legacy. The Fall 2021 list, which includes 20 first time grantees, features organizations notable for their innovative and enduring support for artists through exhibitions, residencies, commissions, publications, and a wide range of public programs that engage critically with artists’ ideas. Their flexibility, creativity and collaborative approach to working with artists help artistic … More

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Something Good—Negro Kiss [alternate version]. 1898. USA. Selig Polyscope. Courtesy the National Library of Norway.

NEW YORK, NY.- Even in the 19th century, a film could have an extended cut. One of the earliest titles screening in this year’s To Save and Project series, the Museum of Modern Art’s annual showcase of recent preservations, is an alternate version of “Something Good — Negro Kiss,” a film put out by the Selig Polyscope Co. in 1898. “Something Good,” which archivist Dino Everett rediscovered in 2017 and scholar Allyson Nadia Field helped identify, shows two vaudeville performers clasping hands and kissing. The Library of Congress added it to the National Film Registry in 2018 and noted that it “may represent the earliest example of African American intimacy onscreen.” The version showing at MoMA, though, in a program of orphan films on Jan. 23, is a little bit longer, even if it still runs less than a minute at the speed being used. This time, the actors, Saint Suttle and Gertie Brown, are on opposite sides of the screen, and Suttle pantomimes … More

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Amy Hood, photo by Scott J. Aaronson.

LOS ANGELES, CA.- The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angelesannounces the appointment of Amy Hood as Chief Communications Officer. In this capacity, Amy will oversee all communications efforts for the museum, including press and marketing, social media, digital, and design. “Amy will be a wonderful addition to MOCA,” said Johanna Burton, The Maurice Marciano Director of MOCA. “Her extensive experience in cultural communications and deep knowledge of the arts in Los Angeles and beyond are great assets as we continue to expand the museum’s reach and build our team.” Amy Hood has worked in arts outreach in Los Angeles for more than 20 years. She comes to MOCA from the J. Paul Getty Trust, where she has worked with the Getty Research Institute and the J. Paul Getty Museum for more than ten years. Previously she was at Ruder Finn Arts & Communications Counselors (now known as Polskin Arts & Communications Counselors, Finn Partners), … More

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62 Hudson River School paintings are being sold online, now thru Feb. 16, by AAR Illuminating circles transform Broadway into glowing tunnel Chrysler Museum spotlights the impact of sea level rise and climate change in new exhibitions
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Oil on canvas by Fred Pansing (N.Y./Germany, 1844-1912), depicting Hudson River Schooners sailing in the widest part of the Hudson River, at the “Tappan Sea”, painted circa 1880.

PLEASANT VALLEY, NY.- An online-only auction dedicated entirely to a single-owner collection of paintings by noted artists from the renowned Hudson River School – 62 works in all – is being held online now, by Absolute Auction & Realty. The auction will end on Wednesday, February 16th. People can register and bid now, on the AAR website, at www.AARauctions.com. The curated auction is from the personal collection of Robert and Susan Doyle of Fishkill, N.Y., dedicated collectors of the first American School of Art that later became known as the Hudson River School, in upstate New York. All the paintings are original works and nearly all have been professionally cleaned and conserved. Every painting would be a worthy addition to a collection. The Hudson River School consisted of mid-19th century “Nature Painters” who found spirituality in nature. These … More

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The Garment District Alliance unveils free outdoor immersive public art installation created by Serge Maheu.

NEW YORK, NY.- The Garment District Alliance has unveiled Passage, an interactive art installation comprised of 20 circles of light that form a pedestrian tunnel on Broadway. As visitors walk through the exhibition, each circle emits light and sounds, creating a transformative, playful experience in the heart of Midtown Manhattan. Located on Broadway in the Garment District between 39th and 40th Streets, Passage is free and will be available to the public through February 13th. “Passage is truly a fantastic exhibition that has transformed the pedestrian experience on Broadway with its bright, colorful presence,” said Barbara A. Blair, president of the Garment District Alliance. “As we kick off the new year, we encourage New Yorkers and visitors to enjoy this outdoor immersive installation as part of their visit to the Garment District.” The interactive installation invites passersby through an … More

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Anastasia Samoylova (American, b. Soviet Union, 1984), Camouflage, 2017. Edition 3 of 5. Pigment print. Courtesy of the artist.

NORFOLK, VA.- The Chrysler Museum of Art unites the work of artists and scientists to explore the effects of sea-level rise, tidal flooding and shoreline erosion in FloodZone: Photographs by Anastasia Samoylova and Waters Rising: A View from Our Backyard, both on view through May 29, 2022. From various sites in Hampton Roads and South Florida, these artists and researchers document, visualize and reflect upon the dire realities of our current climate crisis and its impact on communities along the U.S. East Coast, making palpable seemingly distant issues in our immediate environment and underscoring the urgent need for adaptation. In FloodZone, the Chrysler Museum transports visitors to the vibrant yet vulnerable coastal region of Miami, Florida through Anastasia Samoylova’s striking and stirring photographic account of everyday life in a threatened coastal … More

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carto-1.jpgBankstown Arts Centre opens “Cultural Cartography: Creating Art at the Intersection of Cultures”
SYDNEY.- Curated by one of the most renowned Australian artists, Guan Wei, Cultural Cartography: Creating Art at the Intersection of Cultures opened at Bankstown Arts Centre on 13th January during Sydney Festival. Running as part of Bankstown Arts Centre’s NEXUS, an exciting immersive cultural festival showcasing the energy and vitality of young creatives from Bankstown and beyond, Cultural Cartography: Creating Art at the Intersection of Cultures is a provocative exhibition curated by one of Australia’s most renowned artists Guan Wei and showcasing five young artists – Cindy Chen, NC Qin, Chris Yee, Christina Huynh and Anney Bounpraseuth – whose works contemplate on and reflect the diversity, complexity and dynamics of contemporary humanities and lifestyles. Curator Guan Wei said, “German physicist Werner … More

danceco-1.jpgNai-Ni Chen Dance Company announces new artistic team
NEW YORK, NY.- Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company, a rare Asian American women-led dance company, has been mourning the loss of its artistic leader Nai-Ni Chen for the past week. Ms. Chen is an embodiment of immigrant Chinese American dance artists who came to America to contribute to the world of dance and has since created a company with deep roots in many aspects of community life. Her sudden passing also leaves a legacy of 30 years of work to create cross-cultural dances that empower the next generation of immigrant artists and honors diverse influences in mainstream American culture. To ensure Ms. Chen’s legacy continues to flourish, grow, and inspire the generations to come, the Nai-Ni Chen Dance Company Board of Directors and Executive Director Andrew Chiang announce the appointment of three new artistic leaders … More

carbon-1.jpgExhibition at Carbon 12 presents works by three Austrian-born or Austrian-based artists
DUBAI.- “We […] live in disturbing times, mixed-up times, troubling and turbid times. The task is to become capable, with each other in all of our bumptious kinds, of response. […] Our task is to make trouble, to stir up potent response to devastating events, as well as to settle troubled waters and rebuild quiet places. In urgent times, many of us are tempted to address trouble in terms of making an imagined future safe, of stopping something from happening that looms in the future, of clearing away the present and the past in order to make futures for coming generations. Staying with the trouble does not require such a relationship to times called the future. In fact, staying with the trouble requires learning to be truly present […].”[1] In Staying with the Trouble, theoretician Donna J. Haraway imagines a world in which we live together with various … More

penelope-1.jpgThe visions of Penélope Cruz
NEW YORK, NY.- You have to wonder if Penélope Cruz manifested her first phone call from Pedro Almodóvar. As a young girl growing up in Madrid, she watched Betamax tapes of his movies over and over, hoping that the Spanish auteur might find a place for her in his bright and bold world. She dreamed about it so often that the day he did phone her about a role, it didn’t even feel like the first call — it felt like the tenth, or the hundredth, from someone she already knew very well. That bond was further confirmed when Almodóvar summoned her to his apartment to read scenes. Cruz was still a fledgling actress — it was 1992, and her first two movies, “Jamón Jamón” and “Belle Epoque,” had only just come out — but as she batted lines back and forth with the far more established Almodóvar in his kitchen, their connection couldn’t have been more … More

mocking-1.jpg‘Mockingbird,’ once a Broadway smash, to pause production amid omicron
NEW YORK, NY.- The producers of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” a hit play that had been packing in audiences before the pandemic, announced Wednesday that they would shut the show down until June, lay off the cast and crew, downsize the production and then reopen in a smaller theater. At the same time, “Girl From the North Country,” a heart-tugging musical that uses the songs of Bob Dylan to consider the Depression-era plight of a group of down-on-their-luck Midwesterners in the town where Dylan was born, said it will end its Broadway run on Jan. 23, and would try to reopen in another theater this spring. They became the seventh and eighth Broadway shows to announce temporary or permanent closing dates since early December, when the omicron variant sent coronavirus cases soaring in New York. Their plans for short-term layoffs follow … More

Love-1.jpgLove, trust and heartbreak on two stages
NEW YORK, NY.- When Orpheus turned around to look at Eurydice during the closing performance of Matthew Aucoin and Sarah Ruhl’s “Eurydice” at the Metropolitan Opera, the audience’s collective gasp seemed to shake the grand theater. I recalled another time I heard such a gasp: from the character of Eurydice near the end of “Doubt Comes In,” a song in the Broadway musical “Hadestown.” Then, too, the audience gasped along with her. A lifelong classics nerd, I was surprised both times by the reaction. Does the tale of Orpheus and Eurydice really require a spoiler alert? The myth has been kicking around for more than two millennia, after all. Orpheus, the greatest musician of all, marries Eurydice, who dies when she’s bitten by a snake on their wedding day. He descends to the underworld, where the god of the dead offers him another … More

dale-1.jpgDale Clevenger, Chicago Symphony’s fearless horn master, dies at 81
NEW YORK, NY.- Dale Clevenger, whose expressive, daring playing as the solo French horn of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra for 47 years made him one of the most respected orchestral instrumentalists of his generation, died Jan. 5 at a hospital near his home in Brescia, Italy. He was 81. The cause was complications of Waldenstrom’s disease, a form of lymphoma, his family said. Clevenger was a pillar of the famed Chicago brass section, which has long been renowned as an unrivaled force for its clean, majestic sound, fearless attacks and sheer might. Working with his equally enduring fellow principals, Adolph Herseth on trumpet, Jay Friedman on trombone and Arnold Jacobs on tuba, Clevenger helped shape that section into the envy of the orchestra world and the joy of its conductors. In a statement, Riccardo Muti, the orchestra’s music … More

reggie-1.jpgReggie Wilson explores the power of moving together
NEW YORK, NY.- Even choreographer Reggie Wilson sees how many would think that his new piece, “Power,” is just another version of “ … they stood shaking while others began to shout,” which premiered in 2019. “How many people have made pieces inspired by Mother Rebecca’s Black Shaker community?” he said, dissolving into a characteristic fit of laughter. But while the two works “have some similar movements,” he added, “they’re really not the same piece at all.” When Wilson became aware of Mother Rebecca Cox Jackson, a Shaker eldress who formed her own community in Philadelphia in the 19th century, he was immediately intrigued about how Black and Shaker traditions intertwined — or didn’t. Shaker worship incorporated dance. Both of Wilson’s works are based on an imaginative speculation: What might Jackson’s worship have … More

maria-1.jpgMaria Ewing, dramatically daring opera star, dies at 71
NEW YORK, NY.- Maria Ewing, who sang notable soprano and mezzo-soprano roles at leading houses, including the Metropolitan Opera, beginning in the mid-1970s, and whose ambiguity about her racial heritage helped drive her daughter, actress and director Rebecca Hall, to make the recent movie “Passing,” died Sunday at her home near Detroit. She was 71. A family spokesperson said the cause was cancer. Ewing was a striking presence on opera stages, where she strove to bring an actor’s skills and sensibilities to her roles rather than simply stand and sing. “I’ve watched how actors work and work at it,” Ewing, who was once married to director Peter Hall, told The Orange County Register of California in 1997, when she was appearing in LA Opera’s production of Umberto Giordano’s “Fedora.” “I don’t mean to criticize or underestimate … More

apop-1.jpgA pop star becomes a guru
NEW YORK, NY.- “No matter what any rock star tells you, they’re all conscious of the cult of personality,” Alex Ebert said, looking like a tenured musicology professor with his tan button-down shirt, shaggy beard and horn-rimmed glasses, while seated amid grand pianos and organs. “For a lot of them, that’s their primary occupation.” Ebert, 43, would know. In 2009, as the founder of the Los Angeles folk-rock band Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, he led a 12-member troupe of neo-hippie troubadours into rock ’n’ roll satori with the seismic single “Home.” Maybe you’ve heard the ebullient chorus, “Home is wherever I’m with you!” Or perhaps you can recall the almost revival-choir hook, “Laugh until we think we’ll die, barefoot on a summer night, never could be sweeter than with you,” set to accordions, trumpets and Seven Dwarfs-style whistling. … More

coachella-1.jpgCoachella to return in April with Billie Eilish and Kanye West
NEW YORK, NY.- Billie Eilish, Harry Styles and Kanye West will headline the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in April, as the music industry takes hopeful steps toward the return of festivals and touring in 2022. Coachella, set for its usual two-weekend format, April 15-17 and April 22-24, at the Empire Polo Club in Indio, California, will return after two years mothballed by the pandemic. On Wednesday, after weeks of speculation and leaks in the music press, the festival announced its complete 2022 lineup, which will also feature performances by Megan Thee Stallion, Lil Baby, Doja Cat, Phoebe Bridgers, the reunited electronic dance group Swedish House Mafia and dozens of others. (West is billed on the official festival poster as simply Ye.) The event is expected to run at its full capacity of up to 125,000 concertgoers a day. Coachella … More

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Flashback
On a day like today, French painter and lithographer Henri Fantin-Latour was born
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January 14, 1836. Henri Fantin-Latour (14 January 1836 – 25 August 1904) was a French painter and lithographer best known for his flower paintings and group portraits of Parisian artists and writers. His first major UK gallery exhibition in 40 years took place at the Bowes Museum in April 2011.[3] Musée du Luxembourg presented a retrospective exhibition of his work in 2016-7 entitled “À fleur de peau”. In this image: Henri Fantin-Latour, La leçon de dessin ou Portraits. Oil on canvas, 145 x 170 cm Musées Royaux des Beaux-arts de Belgique, Brussels.

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Historian Discovers He Owns a van Dyck, Ancient Rock Art Vandalized, and more

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JANUARY 10, 2022

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Art Historian Discovers Painting He Bought for £65 May Be the Work of Anthony van Dyck

BY TESSA SOLOMON

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Ancient Rock Art in Texas ‘Irreparably Damaged’ by Vandals

BY ALEX GREENBERGER

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Palais de Tokyo to Return to Experimental Roots with New Leader

BY ALEX GREENBERGER

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For Freedoms Encourages People to Take a Seat at the Table with Rockwell-Inspired NFT

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Uruguay’s First Permanent Contemporary Art Museum Opens

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ArtDaily Newsletter: Monday, Jan 10, 2022

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The First Art Newspaper on the Net facebook.png twitter.png instagram.png Established in 1996 Monday, January 10, 2022
Kunstmuseum Basel presents a comprehensive survey of Camille Pissarro’s work
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Installation view. Photo: Julian Salinas.

BASEL.- Camille Pissarro (1830–1903) ranks among the most distinguished artists of nineteenth-century France. A central figure in Impressionism, he exerted considerable influence over the movement’s evolution. Camille Pissarro. The Studio of Modernism at the Kunstmuseum Basel is the artist’s first retrospective in Switzerland in over six decades. It combines a comprehensive survey of Pissarro’s oeuvre with a spotlight on his collaborative practice and his key role in paving the way for modernism. The exhibition pays tribute to an artist whose achievements are too often overshadowed in histories of the art of the nineteenth century by those of his more prominent colleagues. Artists from several generations, some of whom went on to become leading modernists around the turn from the nineteenth to the twentieth century, trusted his counsel as a friend and mentor. The presentation sheds light on Pissarro’s sustained excha … More

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The Best Photos of the Day
Best Photos of the Day
Fondazione Antonio Dalle Nogare is exhibiting Charlotte Posenenske’s first show in Italy, curated by Vincenzo de Bellis. An internationally acclaimed artist and a figure central to the German minimalist movement, Charlotte Posenenske (1930-1985) worked mainly with sculpture, and received numerous accolades in Germany and from the international scene up until her decision, in 1968, to dedicate her life to sociology.

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Garvey│Simon announces the sixth annual exhibition of work by emerging and mid-career artists Fondazione Antonio Dalle Nogare presents Charlotte Posenenske’s first show in Italy Prehistoric rock art ‘irreparably damaged’ by vandals, officials say
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Twilight & Dawn 10_9, 2c, in situ.

NEW YORK, NY.- Garvey|Simon is presenting Select6, the sixth annual exhibition of work by emerging and mid-career artists chosen by director Elizabeth K. Garvey through the gallery’s innovative Review Program. This year’s artists are: Julia Whitney Barnes, Jimmy Fike, Anne Finkelstein, Jenifer Kent, Lori Larusso, Gwyneth Leech, Claire McConaughy, Debra Ramsay, Linda Schmidt, and Charles Yoder. Garvey|Simon established the Review Program in 2016 to open a dialogue between artists and galleries, a practice that has long been anathema to gallery orthodoxy. Neither the past practice of artists drowning galleries in heaps of slides nor today’s avalanche of emails is beneficial to either gallery or artist. Garvey believes that artists “need to have a working platform to engage with dealers who otherwise might not see their work.” In the multi-tiered program, artists must pay an … More

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Installation view.

BOLZANO.- Fondazione Antonio Dalle Nogare is exhibiting Charlotte Posenenske’s first show in Italy, curated by Vincenzo de Bellis. An internationally acclaimed artist and a figure central to the German minimalist movement, Charlotte Posenenske (1930-1985) worked mainly with sculpture, and received numerous accolades in Germany and from the international scene up until her decision, in 1968, to dedicate her life to sociology. From B to E and More is Posenenske’s first retrospective in Italy, and it traces the evolution of this artist, who died prematurely, by concentrating on a series of works that were created in the span of a decade. In her early works on paper, present in the exhibition in a selection of 17 items, the artist already focused on the exploration of abstract space. International recognition arrived with the conception and exhibition of six … More

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In an undated image provided by the National Park Service, vandalism on a rock at Big Bend National Park in Texas. National Park Service via The New York Times.

by Amanda Holpuch

NEW YORK, NY.- Abstract geometric designs at Big Bend National Park in Texas that had survived for thousands of years were “irreparably damaged” by vandals who scratched names and dates into the prehistoric designs, the National Park Service said. The park service said on its website that the ancient rock art was damaged Dec. 26 in the Indian Head area of the park, which encompasses more than 800,000 acres in southwest Texas and stretches along 118 miles of the U.S. border with Mexico. Since 2015, archaeologists at the park have documented more than 50 instances of vandalism, the park service said. Damaging park resources … More

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High Museum of Art celebrates 25th anniversary of “Picturing the South” series with exhibition Ben Brown Fine Arts presents an exhibition of sculpture and paintings by Robert Indiana Stephen Lawrence, whose music enriched ‘Sesame Street,’ dies at 82
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Jim Goldberg (American, born 1953), Controlled Burn, Wynne, Arkansas, 2021, pigmented inkjet print, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, commissioned with funds from the H.B. and Doris Massey Charitable Trust. Courtesy of the artist. © Jim Goldberg.

ATLANTA, GA.- Launched in 1996, the High Museum of Art’s renowned “Picturing the South” series supports contemporary photographers in creating new bodies of work inspired by the American South for the High’s collection, which is among the nation’s leading photography programs and has strength in work made in and about the region. To commemorate the series’ 25th anniversary, the High presents “Picturing the South: 25 Years” (Nov. 5, 2021-Feb. 6, 2022), which brings together for the first time nearly 200 works from all the past commissions by artists including Dawoud Bey, Sally Mann and Richard Misrach and debuts new work by the latest photographers selected for the series, Sheila Pree Bright, Jim Goldberg and An-My Lê. “The ‘Picturing the South’ commission and exhibition series … More

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Robert Indiana, Four Diamond Ping Red Yellow Black, 2003. Oil on canvas Four panels, 259.1 x 259.1 cm. (102 x 102 in.) overall, 129.5 x 129.5 cm. (51 x 51 in.) each. Artwork © 2021 Star of Hope Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

HONG KONG.- Ben Brown Fine Artsis presenting an exhibition at the Hong Kong gallery of Robert Indiana sculpture and paintings. Robert Indiana (1928-2018), one of the most influential and pioneering American artists since the 1960s, is celebrated for his unique contributions to the Pop art movement in which he embraced the power of language, colour and form, while harnessing the American identity and his own personal history, to produce one of the most iconic bodies of work of the 20th and 21st centuries. After studying at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Skowhegan School of Sculpture and Painting in Maine, and the Edinburgh College of Art in Scotland, Indiana moved to New York in the mid-1950s, where upon encountering Ellsworth Kelly joined a community of artists, including Kelly, Agnes Martin, … More

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He composed the title song of the landmark album “Free to Be … You and Me.” He then moved on to Big Bird and friends.

by Neil Genzlinger

NEW YORK, NY.- Stephen Lawrence, who provided a soundtrack of sorts for countless childhoods as music director for the landmark “Free to Be … You and Me” album and television special and as a longtime composer for “Sesame Street,” died Dec. 30 at a medical center in Belleville, New Jersey. He was 82. His wife, Cathy (Merritt) Lawrence, said the cause was multiple organ failure. Lawrence had a gift for catchy tunes and song constructions that would appeal to young minds. “One of the most effective devices, and for children one of the most important, is repetition,” he wrote in “How to Compose Music for Children,” an essay on his blog. “Did you write a first line you like? Why not repeat it?” The essay went on to show how composers from Beethoven to John Lennon had done just that, and Lawrence employed the device … More

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Sargent’s Daughters opens an exhibition of works by painter and interdisciplinary artist Cielo Felix-Hernandez Andrew Kreps Gallery opens its first exhibition with Raymond Saunders in New York Dwayne Hickman, TV’s lovelorn Dobie Gillis, dies at 87
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Cielo Felix-Hernandez, (Autorretrato) La Pintora, 2021. Oil on canvas, hibiscus wash, 20 x 24 inches.

NEW YORK, NY.- Sargent’s Daughters is presenting nieta, the first New York solo presentation of Cielo Felix-Hernandez, a Brooklyn-based painter and interdisciplinary artist. Working primarily in oil paint, Felix-Hernandez draws on memory and aesthetics derived from cultural legacy to reflect her lived experience as a trans-femme Boricua. Her exuberant palette and detailed, referential compositions draw viewers in to a space of care, resilience, and joy. The roots of Felix-Hernandez’s paintings are autobiographical, referencing an upbringing caught between the island of Puerto Rico and the mainland of the United States. They contain traces of the past which express the artist’s diasporic roots, as well as those of her mother and grandmother. The exhibition’s title, nieta (granddaughter), serves to highlight the importance of generational ties, especially across geographical distance. For Felix-Hernandez, this familial wa … More

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Raymond Saunders, Untitled. Mixed media on panel, 64 1/8 x 48 1/8 inches (163 x 122 cm.)

NEW YORK, NY.- Andrew Kreps Gallery is presenting the gallery’s first exhibition with Raymond Saunders in New York at 22 Cortlandt Alley. Spanning the 1980s to the present, the exhibition is Saunders’ first in New York in over twenty years and includes previously unexhibited works from the artist’s Paris Studio. Since the 1960s, Raymond Saunders has developed a singular practice defined by an improvisational approach, as he culls eclectic ephemera, signage, detritus, and other materials from his daily life which reflect his living environment. A cult-like figure in the Bay Area art scene, Saunders’ paintings and installation-based works are loaded with rich swaths of paint, interwoven with found materials and his own notational marks, and white-pencil drawings. Blackboard surfaces, left visible through a heavy accumulation of marks and material, tie Saunders’ works inextricably to his role as an educator, as he handwrites simple equat … More

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He went on to appear in movies and other TV shows and to work as a television executive, but the role of Dobie would dog him for decades.

by Margalit Fox

NEW YORK, NY.- Dwayne Hickman, the affable, apple-cheeked actor whose starring role in the revered sitcom “The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis” would dog him for more than a half-century, died Sunday in Los Angeles. He was 87. The cause was complications of Parkinson’s disease, a spokesperson for his family said. Broadcast on CBS from 1959 to 1963, “The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis” was an essential ingredient of adolescence for the postwar generation and remained popular in syndication for years. Hickman became one of TV’s first teenage idols for his portrayal of its lovelorn hero, and he remained indelibly identified with the character ever after, a fate he bore with genial resignation. “Dobie Gillis” followed the fortunes of its hero, his friends and family in Central City, a community whose precise location … More

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Quiet awards season has Hollywood uneasy The history and the art and the allure of a famous blue dye on show at Albuquerque Museum The South Street Seaport Museum opens ‘South Street and the Rise of New York’
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Guests arrive on the red carpet at the 79th Academy Awards in Los Angeles, Feb. 25, 2007. J. Emilio Flores/The New York Times.

by Nicole Sperling

LOS ANGELES, CA.- Steven Spielberg directing a dance-filled musical through the streets of New York. Lady Gaga channeling her Italian roots. Will Smith back on the big screen. This year’s award season was supposed to celebrate Hollywood’s return to glitz and glamour. No more masks, no more socially distanced award shows or Zoom acceptance speeches, no more rewarding films that very few people had seen. Now, between the omicron spike and NBC’s decision not to televise the Golden Globes on Sunday because of the ethical issues surrounding the group that hands out the awards, Hollywood’s traditionally frenetic — and hype-filled — first week of the calendar year has been reduced to a whisper. The AFI Awards were postponed. The … More

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Bamileke Society Man’s Prestige Hat; Cameroon; 2017; handspun cotton, indigo dye; 9 x 7 in.; lent by the Museum of International Folk Art.

ALBUQUERQUE, NM.- Albuquerque Museum is presenting Indelible Blue: Indigo Across the Globe. The exhibition opened at Albuquerque Museum on January 8, 2022. Indelible Blue explores the history, techniques, and movement of indigo, tracing the different varieties of plants back to the regions and cultures that have utilized this elusive dye for millennia. Indelible Blue features artists from around the world currently working with indigo as well as historical objects from Asia, South Asia, Africa, The Americas, and New Mexico. The exhibition considers how artists are reflecting on the cultural and geographical significance of the color blue and traditional ways of dyeing as well as contemplating the social and cultural narratives that impact the present and the future. The chemical compound (indican) required to produce indigo dye … More

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“RMS Olympic passing the Ambrose Channel lightship” ca. 1920. Gift of Michael R. Harrison, South Street Seaport Museum 2020.5

NEW YORK, NY.- The South Street Seaport Museum announced the opening of a new introductory gallery “South Street and the Rise of New York” on Saturdays and Sundays from 11am to 5pm, at 12 Fulton Street. “South Street and the Rise of New York” explores the critical role played by the Seaport and South Street in securing New York’s place as America’s largest city and its rise to become the world’s busiest port by the start of the 20th century. The exhibition showcases the Seaport Museum’s vast collection of works or art and artifacts via large reproduction and selected artifacts on display related to the 19th century history of the Port of New York. The exhibition starts with a contemporary aerial photograph depicting New York Harbor, one of the best natural harbors in the world, and enlarged images from the Museum’s collections illustrating the meaning … More

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A Story of Restitution – Rafael Cardoso
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More News
derek-1.jpgDerek Eller Gallery opens a solo exhibition of new paintings and ceramic sculptures by artist Jiha Moon
NEW YORK, NY.- Derek Eller Gallery is presenting a solo exhibition of new paintings and ceramic sculptures by Atlanta-based artist Jiha Moon. Working with a palette of super-saturated yellows, oranges, magentas and blues against contrasting dark Hanji (Korean mulberry paper) and brown stoneware, Moon mixes ingredients from Asian tradition and folklore, Western contemporary art, and global popular culture to create a vibrant and personal visual language in both two and three dimensions. Throughout many of the works in this exhibition, Moon incorporates a particular shade of “Stranger Yellow” which she describes as a “mysterious, luscious, yet cautiously high-key color that stands out”. Born in Korea in 1973, Moon has lived in the United States for over twenty years, and this color speaks to her notions of the visibility of the Asian community in America, as well as her … More

theroyal-1.jpgThe Royal Scottish Academy opens two new exhibitions
EDINBURGH.- IRON: Translating Territories explores the many roles that iron plays within our lives, seeking new routes and practices to map unfamiliar territories and possibilities through art practice. The exhibition uncovers diverse understandings of the physical world around us and reveals the creative potential and complexity of this singular material. Academician Gordon Munro RSA has assembled a pan-European group of artists, each bringing a unique perspective in their responses to the place of iron in our lives and its use as an artistic medium. Munro and Ewan Robertson are each exhibiting installation works assembled from recycled iron objects, whilst Oana Stanciu’s performative exploration of iron is on view. Clare Flatley’s work responds to the place of iron in theories of alchemy and Michał Staszczak and Paweł Czekański extend traditional methods into contemporary … More

almine-1.jpgAlmine Rech Shanghai presents Rudolf Polanszky’s second solo exhibition at the gallery
SHANGHAI.- Almine Rech Shanghai is presenting Rudolf Polanszky’s second solo exhibition at the gallery, on view from December 10, 2021 to January 27, 2022. Apeiron, the title of Rudolf Polanszky’s exhibition, mirrors his “ad hoc synthesis approach” of building and dissolving purely abstract forms. With a selection of recent works, drawn from his Reconstructions series, Polanszky further implodes the Modernist palimpsest via his hybrid paintings and sculpture. Along with his films, music and documented performances, Polanszky’s body of work finds inspiration from mathematical metaphysics, rather than the canon of art history. Apeiron, according to the Greek philosopher Anaximander, is the source of everything, a boundless force which having emerged from nothing, is inevitably drawn to reconciliation in the guise of the infinite void of its origin. Experiencing Polanszky’s work … More

thepower-1.jpgThe power of Sidney Poitier
NEW YORK, NY.- When Sidney Poitier died Thursday at 94, tributes poured forth for him, the first Black performer to win the Academy Award for best actor, and a man whom President Joe Biden called a “once-in-a-generation actor and advocate” whose work “changed the world on and off the big screen.” Four critics for The New York Times reflect on Poitier’s influence and legacy. The elegance, the poise, the steely spine — but, oh, the face — when I think of Sidney Poitier, I first think of how beautiful he was and the sheer physical perfection of the man. He had the kind of old-fashioned Hollywood beauty and glamour that made the movies and made audiences dream and desire, turning them into repeat customers. There was much more to Poitier, yes, and he will be rightly remembered as a towering figure in the civil rights movement, one that has always been fought on the screen … More

circa-1.jpgCult artist Arca commissioned for New Year on Piccadilly Lights
LONDON.- The ground-breaking experimental artist, Arca invites audiences to enter into a sci-fi playground for Untitled, CIRCA’s new commission which will premiere on Piccadilly Lights in London and on a global network of screens in Los Angeles, Milan, Melbourne, New York, Seoul and Tokyo on New Year’s Day and throughout January 2022 daily at 20:22. Blurring the line between art and technology, Arca trained an algorithm with 31 images of her mixed media paintings, allowing these material real-world artworks to transcend the physical realm to debut her emergence as a visual artist on the global stage. Arca said: “I hope you are compelled by these interpolated paintings of mine to take a moment and let the visual ASMR produce pleasure, allow for a moment of respite and solace, the experience of warped beauty.” Alejandra Ghersi Rodríguez, known professionally as Arca, is one … More

newbook-1.jpgNew book offers an intimate view of life with autism, beautifully photographed, and told from personal experience
NEW YORK, NY.- Mary Berridge’s award-winning series of photographs is paired with narratives written primarily by the subjects or their parents. The book Visible Spectrum offers an intimate view of life with autism, as told from within an autism community, which includes Berridge and her son. It encourages an alternate way of seeing the condition, in which the diverse and unconventional perspectives of the autistic are valued. It also explores the ways the autistic and their families navigate a world which is not made for them and in which they are not always welcome. Despite this,the stories may surprise readers with their thought-provoking and affirmative viewpoints on autism and being different. The formally composed and quietly luminous portraits allude to the … More

post-1.jpgPostmasters presents its first exhibition with Chando Ao
NEW YORK, NY.- Postmasters is presenting its first exhibition with Chando Ao, a Chinese multimedia artist who splits his time between New York and Shanghai. The exhibition with its deceptively simple title “My I’ (inspired by Douglas Hofstadter and Daniel Dennett’s book The Mind’s I) consists of a series of artworks that function as tools for the viewer’s sensory experiences. Chando Ao’s works, where technology and human experience intersect, provide a variety of tools to confuse, inspire, induce, stimulate, and disturb the audience; to let them generate new feelings about their “I”; to connect irrelevant things beyond intellectual experience; to make the obvious strange and, perhaps, to make the strange obvious. Then, “I” becomes vivid. The objects in the show – two digital drawings, two chairs, two dogs, two vessels, and three screen mirrors – are all interactive, self-reflective instruments to … More

changing-1.jpg‘Changing the Story: Photographs of British Life in Black and White, 1917-1962’ opens at the North Wall Arts Centre
OXFORD.- Changing the Story brings to light a neglected strand in British history, through a series of striking photographs dating from 1917 to 1962, interpreted by award-winning writer and performer Rommi Smith during her time as the inaugural writer-in-residence at leading photographic agency TopFoto. Thirty-four of these revelatory photographs will go on public display for the first time alongside new writing by Smith which responds directly to the photographs. Changing the Story runs at the North Wall from 10 until 29 January 2022 and admission is free. Commissioned to delve into the archive at TopFoto, Smith was struck by how many of the fleeting moments captured by photographers such as Ken Russell and Roger Bamber disrupt monoculturalist ideas of … More

berk-1.jpgBAMPFA presents US premiere of new video installation from Jumana Manna
BERKELEY, CA.- The UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive has co-commissioned a new film installation from Jumana Manna that is receiveing its US premiere at the museum. Drawing on the artist’s ongoing interest in the paradoxes of preservation practices and their ties to colonial power structures, Foragers explores the criminalization of Palestinian herb foraging practices under the pretext of protecting endangered plants. This hour-long film blends documentary, fiction, and archival footage primarily from Jerusalem and the Galilee region of Palestine/Israel, where Manna grew up and continues to shoot many of her films. The project opened at BAMPFA as Jumana Manna / MATRIX 278, the latest installment in BAMPFA’s MATRIX Program for Contemporary Art and Manna’s first solo museum exhibition on the West Coast. Jumana Manna is a Berlin-based artist … More

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PhotoGalleries
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Imants Tillers

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Le Design Pour Tous

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New Galleries of Dutch and Flemish Art

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Cassi Namoda

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Flashback
On a day like today, English sculptor Barbara Hepworth was born
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January 10, 1903. Dame Jocelyn Barbara Hepworth DBE (10 January 1903 – 20 May 1975) was an English artist and sculptor. Her work exemplifies Modernism and in particular modern sculpture. She was one of the few female artists of her generation to achieve international prominence. Along with artists such as Ben Nicholson and Naum Gabo, Hepworth was a leading figure in the colony of artists who resided in St Ives during the Second World War. In this image: Dame Barbara Hepworth, Parent I, conceived in 1970, number 2 of the 4 individual casts that were made of each of the nine figures (est. £2,000,000-3,000,000). Photo: Sotheby’s.

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Ignacio Villarreal
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Editor & Publisher: Jose Villarreal
Art Director: Juan José Sepúlveda Ramírez
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